BLACKSPACE: A MEMORY LANDSCAPE by blackpowerprincess

Curation of Archival  Black Imagery, Sounds, excerpts  and documents pertaining to Black people

FREE RESOURCES WILL BE UPDATED WEEKLY

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Black art cannot escape being measured in adjacent to the presence and absence of westernness and whiteness. Black art becomes contemporary though its commodification. It transcends under western possession. Black Art is “neo-traditional” existing in a vexing didactic space between black antiquity and “modernity" Now more than ever, it is important for Black people study our own archive and  to create images, sounds and objects. Self expression and creation is a political act. Through this virtual gallery, I explore the archive of blackness as a memory landscape. In its first iteration, it exhibits images  from the mid-late  20th century.



Jacques Derrida argues, “[There is no political power without control of the archive, if not memory.   the archive affirms the past, present, and future; it preserves the records of the past and it embodies the promise of the present to the future. If the archive cannot or does not accommodate a particular kind of information or mode of scholarship, then it is effectively excluded from the historical record.”. I encourage the viewers think of ways our own personal archives affirm our past, present, and future. How do our creations fit into larger archives?  Does the passage of time  always equate to change? 

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BLACK ORPHEUS BY MARCEL CAMUS - 1959

CAPOIERA

Alice Coltrane - Turiya And Ramakrishna

WHITE PEOPLE HAVE A VERY SERIOUS PROBLEM- TONI MORRISON ON CHARLIE ROSE


JOHN COLETRANE- SPIRITUAL

FRED HAMPTON DOCUMENTARY


MAHALIA JACKSON SINGS AMAZING GRACE

We are in an historical moment for Black visual culture. The visuals we see are more often than not hyper black Hyper Blackness- false hyper blackness a blackness that is governed by trade,

- KOBENA MERCER

Who is the Nigger? -James Baldwin

NINA SIMONE- MISSISSIPPI GODDAMN 

Black Leaders Discussion feat. Angela Davis, Kwame Ture & Fannie Lou Hamer (1973)

INTERVIEW WITH FANNIE LOU HAMMER


NINA SIMONE ON BLACK PEOPLE


STOKELY CARMICHAEL BLACK POWER SPEECH 1966

James Baldwin & Nikki Giovanni, a conversation [FULL]

BELL HOOKS Cultural Criticism and Transformation

Comment #1- Gil Scott Heron


Bobbie Washington braiding her daughter Ayana’s hair, Langton St. 1982 Photography by Janet Delaney

Miles Davis - So What - The Robert Herridge Theater, New York - April 2, 1959


RUMBA

Using Format